Write This Down: quotation marks

Write This Down: quotation marks

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This week in Write This Down: quotation marks – Alanna Miller, manager, Russell Tobin & Associates

After a brief sabbatical Write This Down is back, and we’re talking about quotation marks.

  • In American English, periods and commas always go inside the quotation marks. There are no exceptions to this. For example:

There is an easy trick for remembering how to spell “assume.”

However, in British English periods and commas go wherever it would make the most sense in the context of the sentence. In the UK the sentence would be:

There is an easy trick for remembering how to spell “assume”.

That is why you will see this done both ways.

  • Question marks and exclamations points can go inside or outside quotation marks, depending on the context of the sentence.

– Did you see “Inside Out”?

– Jim yelled down the hall, “Don’t forget to lock the door!”

  • Use quotations marks (or italics) for titles, including books, newspapers, magazines, plays, movies and songs.
  • When using quotation marks to indicate irony, always use double (not single) quotations.

– Jennifer “cleaned” the kitchen.

To simply indicate emphasis use bold or italics instead, to avoid a misleading sign like the one above.